I get questions from clients regarding inbox management quite often. Below are a few examples of what I’ve come across.

“My inbox is overflowing, help!”

“How am I ever going to get through all of these emails?”

“What if I miss something important?”

Does this sound familiar? Are you struggling to keep up with the overflow of emails coming through 24/7? Are important emails going unanswered because you didn’t see them among all of the others? If so, I think I can provide some easy steps that will allow you to manage your inbox with ease. I’ve helped a lot of my clients get their emails organized while keeping their inboxes at a minimum level.

Now, I’m not going to tell you that this will happen overnight, and I’m not going to tell you that your inbox will be empty all the time either. But, what I will say is that you will feel confident to never miss another important email again, you will never have to spend time sorting through your inbox to find those missing emails, and you will always be aware what is coming in and what is being sent out. As long you follow these steps:

  • Prioritize: This is the first thing I ask my clients to do. I like to have at least 2 priority levels, highest (most urgent) and lowest. However, this is not static and can change depending on the number of emails you receive. I’ve had clients with priority levels 1, 2, 3 and 4. It’s all up to you!
  • Action items (optional): This is an optional step that I like to include for special circumstances. If you consistently receive a lot of calendar invitations or certain messages that are highly urgent. Having an action category with a bright colored labeled will be very beneficial. I like to leave these emails in the inbox so they won’t be missed.
  • Color code: I feel that this is such a simple, yet valuable way to organize not only emails but calendars as well. When your eye is drawn to a specific color, you’ll automatically see the importance. I like to have my clients create color-coded labels (or folders) to help identify the priority levels. For example: Green= lowest priority, orange= highest priority, red= action item.
  • Think- Read, Categorize, Respond, Archive or Delete: Try to get yourself into the habit of going through your inbox at the beginning of your work day. This entails sorting through your emails and categorizing each email with its priority level, then respond (if needed, depending on priority and time). Once finished, delete or archive. By doing this you will get rid of any junk emails that may be filtering through, and you will be able to respond to your most urgent messages in a timely manner.

Trust me, these steps may seem like a lot at first but once you get used to the process it’s extremely simple. In no time you will have successfully managed your inbox, you’ll find everything in its place, nice and organized.

Do you have anything you would like to add that may have helped you get organized?

how-to-handle-mistakes

We all make mistakes, so how should we handle them? 

Does the circumstance matter? Should our clients be privy to every mistake that is made? In my experience, it’s best to take these 4 steps when you find yourself in such an unfortunate situation.

  1. Acknowledge it
  2. Learn from it
  3. Fix it
  4. Move on!

Acknowledging the mistake means taking responsibility for the error that was caused, plus this will prove your credibility. Depending on the size of the mistake, you should consider disclosing it to your client as well. I’m not talking about a little mistake you can easily fix. No client wants to be bothered with every little thing. I’m talking about something that can be detrimental to the workplace. It is essential that you bite the bullet and spill the beans no matter how hard it may be. You don’t want to be caught in a lie down the road if you never disclosed the mistake in the first place.

Learning from your mistake. Now, this is important because you don’t want to be repeating the same mistakes over again. Write it down, set reminders, practice, etc. Do what you have to so the mistake is not made again.  Remind yourself to double and triple check everything prior to moving forward. This will make it less likely for another error to occur.

Fixing the mistake. Since you were the one who made the mistake, it is now your responsibility to correct it. Sometimes the timing alone can be essential, so make sure to correct the error as soon as possible and go out of your way to ensure it has been fixed correctly. 

Now you can breathe easily and move on! Take it easy on yourself, don’t spend time focusing on the mistake you made and the reasons why. That will just cause you to worry, and worrying can cause more mistakes. If you follow these 4 steps I guarantee the likelihood of making another mistake will decrease dramatically.

Remember we all make mistakes every now and then, but how you handle them is what makes all the difference. 

5-tips-to-get-you-motivated

We all have our own scenarios and reasons as to why we’re not feeling motivated. You went to bed too late, woke up too early, or you’re just not getting enough sleep in general. It could be that it’s Friday and your entire week has been exhausting, or it’s Monday and you are not quite ready for the week ahead. Whatever the reason, we all have them. So I’ve come up with some quick tips to help you get going when you least feel like it.

  1. Set Your Alarm: Not only will this wake you up, but I find if I set my alarm 30 minutes before I actually want to get up, it helps get my brain in ‘wake up’ mode.
  2. Give yourself at least 20 minutes to mentally prepare for the day: I’m not good when I’m running late. I like to take my time with my morning routine. I like to get my coffee ready, my workspace all set-up etc. When you’re prepared, you’re more likely to feel motivated for the workday.
  3. Make a list: I don’t know about you, but I like to know what needs to get done each day. I like to see it in front of me, on paper. Not just what is on my calendar, but all of the small things that need to be accomplished before days end. Crossing those things off my list just adds to my motivation.
  4. Set a big goal for the day (something do-able): At the bottom of my daily list I like to set one large goal for the day. This could be working on a major project you have going, creating content, or that one thing you’ve been putting off for weeks. This should be something you can get done in a day.
  5. Routine, routine, routine: This is the most important step! Make a routine for yourself. This is essential if you want to get things done in a timely manner. The more you do it, the more likely it will become repetitive. Having a routine will make you feel efficient, confident and eager to start your workday. This is a major step for motivation, so jump in!